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ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus financed within the institutional grant by the Government of Sweden.
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Author
  • Nutsa Bazlidze
  • Archil Chapichadze
  • Giorgi Bakradze
  • Mery Julakidze
  • Givi Melkadze
  • Giorgi Machavariani
  • Giorgi Mekerishvili
  • Nino Abashidze
  • Rezo Geradze
  • Giorgi Bregadze
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  • Giorgi Tsutskiridze
  • Ia Vardishvili
  • Robizon Khubulashvili
  • Adam Pellillo
  • Saba Devdariani
  • Nino Mosiashvili
  • Nikoloz Pkhakadze
  • Charles Johnson
  • Maya Grigolia
  • Lasha Lanchava
  • Nino Doghonadze
  • Mariam Zaldastanishvili
  • Zurab Abramishvili
  • Gigla Mikautadze
  • Ivane Pirveli
  • Irakli Galdava
  • Florian Biermann
  • Irakli Shalikashvili
  • Olga Azhgibetseva
  • Phatima Mamardashvili
  • Eric Livny
  • David Zhorzholiani
  • Nino Kakulia
  • Laura Manukyan
  • Irakli Barbakadze
  • Lika Goderdzishvili
  • Selam Petersson
  • Sophiko Skhirtladze
  • Irakli Kochlamazashvili
  • Levan Pavlenishvili
  • Gocha Kardava
  • Rati Porchkhidze
  • Lasha Labadze
  • Muhammad Asali
  • Karine Torosyan
  • Levan Tevdoradze
  • Mariam Katsadze
  • Ana Burduli
  • Davit Keshelava
  • Giorgi Mzhavanadze
  • Elene Seturidze
  • Tamta Maridashvili
  • Mariam Tsulukidze
  • Erekle Shubitidze
  • Guram Lobzhanidze
  • Mariam Lobjanidze
  • Mariam Chachava
  • Maka Chitanava
  • Salome Deisadze
  • Ia Katsia
  • Salome Gelashvili
  • Tamar Sulukhia
  • Norberto Pignatti
  • Giorgi Papava
  • Luc Leruth
  • Yaroslava Babych
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Labor Market Reform: Is the Glass Half Full or Half Empty?
On the 5th of August, a list of planned legislative amendments for regulating the functioning of the labor market passed their second reading in parliament. These amendments, which are also likely to pass their third and final reading in the coming weeks, are expected to improve workers’ protection.
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New Old Chavchavadze Avenue – Putting the Horse Ahead of the Cart?
One issue on the tip of everyone’s tongue these days in Tbilisi—along with the August holidays and the risks of COVID-19—is the newly-rehabilitated Chavchavadze Avenue, which was recently reopened to traffic. Why is this issue so “popular”?
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The Georgian COVID-19 Response: Was the Lockdown Worthwhile?
Since its start, the pandemic has spread to more than 180 countries, with governments around the world each reacting differently to the new global threat. The Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker gauges the strictness of countries’ responses using a stringency index, which compares governmental policies over several dimensions.
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Mortgage Subsidy – Encouraging Borrowing in the Midst of a Crisis
On 28 May, Georgia announced its fourth anti-crisis plan, in which the government will subsidize 4 percent of the interest rate of mortgage loans for five years. The subsidy will be issued for loans not exceeding 200,000 GEL and will only apply to those taking mortgages for the purchase of residential apartments that are newly built or under construction, from 1 June 2020 to 1 January 2021. The state will also ensure the completion of ongoing construction.
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The Impact of Food Safety Regulations on Agricultural Trade
From a trade perspective, the most important aspects of the EU-Georgia Association Agreement, signed on 27 June 2014, including the Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area (DCFTA), are the Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) measures and the food safety standards and technical regulations required for access to European markets. Georgia’s export to the EU is still rather limited, and one possible cause for this deficiency, amongst others, is the limited capacity to comply with food safety regulations and standards.
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Seasonal Effects and COVID Lockdown Combined Close the Generation-Consumption Gap in April
In April 2020, total generation and consumption nearly balanced (944 mln kWh of generation and 941 mln kWh of consumption), with power generation exceeding consumption by only 3 mln. kWh (corresponding to 0.3% of total generation: Figure 1). This occurred due to the simultaneous decrease in total consumption (7%) and total generation (2%). Interestingly, over the same period, wind power generation increased by a remarkable 23% compared to April 2019.
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