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ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
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Author
  • Guenther Baechler
  • Veriko Shengelia
  • Giorgi Bakradze
  • Khatia Tsaava
  • Goga Sukhashvili
  • Irakli Jgharkava
  • Shota Katamadze
  • Mariam Gogotchuri
  • Tinatin Kebadze
  • Irakli Jintcharadze
  • Lasha Khutsishvili
  • Mery Julakidze
  • Givi Melkadze
  • Giorgi Machavariani
  • Andrei Sarychev
  • Giorgi Mekerishvili
  • Nino Abashidze
  • Aleqsandre Bluashvili
  • Rezo Geradze
  • Giorgi Bregadze
  • Aram Derdzyan
  • Astghik Mkhitaryan
  • Giorgi Kelbakiani
  • Giorgi Tsutskiridze
  • George Basheli
  • Ia Vardishvili
  • Robizon Khubulashvili
  • Tom Coupe
  • Adam Pellillo
  • Lasha Arevadze
  • Saba Devdariani
  • Nino Mosiashvili
  • Nikoloz Pkhakadze
  • Jan Klingelhofer
  • Martin Smith
  • Medea Davlasheridze
  • Tamari Giorgadze
  • Aram Grigoryan
  • Charles Johnson
  • Levan Bzhalava
  • Maya Grigolia
  • Izat Berenaliev
  • Lasha Lanchava
  • Nino Zambakhidze
  • Nino Doghonadze
  • Simon Appleby
  • Rafael Castro
  • Givi Kupatadze
  • Ruediger Heining
  • Mariam Zaldastanishvili
  • Zurab Abramishvili
  • Salome Goglichidze
  • Gigla Mikautadze
  • Hans Gutbrod
  • Kalman Mizsei
  • Ivane Pirveli
  • Irakli Galdava
  • Victor Kipiani
  • Florian Biermann
  • Irakli Shalikashvili
  • Olga Azhgibetseva
  • Phatima Mamardashvili
  • Eric Livny
  • Aleksandra Markovic
  • David Zhorzholiani
  • Nino Kakulia
  • Matsatso Tepnadze
  • Laura Manukyan
  • Irakli Barbakadze
  • Lika Goderdzishvili
  • Selam Petersson
  • Sophiko Skhirtladze
  • Irakli Kochlamazashvili
  • Levan Pavlenishvili
  • Jemal Tsintsabadze
  • Nika Molashvili
  • Gocha Kardava
  • Rati Porchkhidze
  • Mariam Galdava
  • Lasha Labadze
  • Guranda Darchidze
  • Muhammad Asali
  • Karine Torosyan
  • Levan Tevdoradze
  • Mariam Katsadze
  • Ana Burduli
  • Davit Keshelava
  • Elene Seturidze
  • Mariam Tsulukidze
  • Erekle Shubitidze
  • Guram Lobzhanidze
  • Mariam Lobjanidze
  • Mariam Chachava
  • Maka Chitanava
  • Salome Deisadze
  • Ia Katsia
  • Salome Gelashvili
  • Tamar Sulukhia
  • Norberto Pignatti
  • Giorgi Papava
  • Luc Leruth
  • Yaroslava Babych
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Environmental Protection and Rural Development in Georgia in 2030. How Does the Plan Look?
Back in the summer of 2021, the Government of Georgia (GoG) worked on a 10-year strategic framework for different sectors of the economy including agriculture. In July 2021, Georgia’s Prime Minister Irakli Garibashvili announced the targets for the Ministry of Environmental Protection and Agriculture (MEPA) under the government’s 10-year-strategic framework.
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The Wheat Market in Georgia
On February 15th 2021, export quotas on wheat, rye, maize, and barley entered into force in Russia.
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To Subsidize or Not to Subsidize Georgia’s Wine Sector?
ISET-PI’s research assistant Irakli Shalikashvili was interviewed by Maestro TV’s Business Contact programme where he discussed the Georgian Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) downward trend; according to a recent survey, compared with November 2016, the CCI decreased sharply from -11.5 to -26.5 (by 15 points). This is the most dramatic loss of the CCI ever observed since measuring consumer confidence in Georgia began in 2012. According to Irakli, this has nothing to do with any “winter blues”, as in the same period of last year, the CCI went up from -40 to -30.4. Watch the video from Maestro TV to learn more.
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Agricultural Anti-Crisis Plan Assessment
The UNDP Farmer Knowledge Project was carried out in two phases. Data on Georgian rural households1 was collected by the polling agency Analysis and Consulting Team (ACT) between February and July 2015. 2 This data was analyzed with the purpose of producing policy recommendations by the ISET Policy Institute between November 2015 and July 2016. The project pursued three overarching goals: (i) to understand which gaps in agricultural knowledge of Georgian farmers have the strongest impact on farmers’ productivity and income, and recommend relevant agricultural extension measures; (ii) to predict structural and social changes in Georgia’s agriculture under different scenarios; (iii) to suggest appropriate policy interventions to mitigate or encourage these changes.
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Agriculture in Georgia: Are There Any Real Changes in the Sector?
ISET Policy Institute together with Japan Tobacco International (JTI) Georgia offers free of charge training program "Leaders in Development". The program is designed for anybody who is involved in, or is affected by, public policy decisions: government analysts and decision-makers, parliament staffers, private sector executives, civil society activists, as well as development professionals working in international organizations. The ten modules of the program tackle some of the most important challenges of Georgia’s economic development, with a focus on how policy decisions (or indecision) directly and indirectly affect Georgian society, businesses and households. For example, we will discuss the implications of changes in tax administration and taxation (corporate, income, excise, VAT) on prices, investment, domestic production and consumption, human capital and labor supply.
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Inclusive and Sustainable Development of The Mountainous Regions: Myth or Reality?
The aim of the report is to summarize main findings from the interviews conducted by AYPEG and provide suggestions and recommendations for the research and training needs in the Georgian energy sector. Report also includes individual interview summaries (40 in total) as an appendix that enables to identify each organizations opinion on the research and training needs. The aim of the project was to assess the main research objectives and training needs in the Georgian energy sector. Energy sector appears one of the most promising sectors in Georgia and especially hydro power which is one of the main resources of the country. On the other hand, more than 80% of the energy resource remains unutilized. Consequently, now when Georgia is paving its own way of economic development, it is crucial to determine main research questions and access training needs. This will help to allocate intellectual/financial resources where it is mostly required and help the sector to exploit country’s energy potential.
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