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ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus financed within the institutional grant by the Government of Sweden.
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Author
  • Eka Nozadze
  • Nutsa Bazlidze
  • Archil Chapichadze
  • Giorgi Bakradze
  • Mery Julakidze
  • Givi Melkadze
  • Giorgi Machavariani
  • Giorgi Mekerishvili
  • Nino Abashidze
  • Rezo Geradze
  • Giorgi Bregadze
  • Giorgi Kelbakiani
  • Giorgi Tsutskiridze
  • Ia Vardishvili
  • Robizon Khubulashvili
  • Adam Pellillo
  • Saba Devdariani
  • Nino Mosiashvili
  • Nikoloz Pkhakadze
  • Charles Johnson
  • Maya Grigolia
  • Lasha Lanchava
  • Nino Doghonadze
  • Mariam Zaldastanishvili
  • Zurab Abramishvili
  • Gigla Mikautadze
  • Ivane Pirveli
  • Irakli Galdava
  • Florian Biermann
  • Irakli Shalikashvili
  • Olga Azhgibetseva
  • Phatima Mamardashvili
  • Eric Livny
  • David Zhorzholiani
  • Nino Kakulia
  • Laura Manukyan
  • Irakli Barbakadze
  • Lika Goderdzishvili
  • Selam Petersson
  • Sophiko Skhirtladze
  • Irakli Kochlamazashvili
  • Levan Pavlenishvili
  • Gocha Kardava
  • Rati Porchkhidze
  • Lasha Labadze
  • Muhammad Asali
  • Karine Torosyan
  • Levan Tevdoradze
  • Mariam Katsadze
  • Ana Burduli
  • Davit Keshelava
  • Giorgi Mzhavanadze
  • Elene Seturidze
  • Tamta Maridashvili
  • Mariam Tsulukidze
  • Erekle Shubitidze
  • Guram Lobzhanidze
  • Mariam Lobjanidze
  • Mariam Chachava
  • Maka Chitanava
  • Salome Deisadze
  • Ia Katsia
  • Salome Gelashvili
  • Tamar Sulukhia
  • Norberto Pignatti
  • Giorgi Papava
  • Luc Leruth
  • Yaroslava Babych
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Inflation of Trust
World economies hampered by the pandemic; countries facing public healthcare crises, with millions killed by COVID-19; thousands of cities under lockdown; social distancing and transformed social practices; countless institutions functioning online; the youth spending endless days and nights in front of computer screens; and, globally, over a year of online education. This is the reality in many countries around the world, including Georgia, in the spring of 2021.
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New Old Chavchavadze Avenue – Putting the Horse Ahead of the Cart?
One issue on the tip of everyone’s tongue these days in Tbilisi—along with the August holidays and the risks of COVID-19—is the newly-rehabilitated Chavchavadze Avenue, which was recently reopened to traffic. Why is this issue so “popular”?
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Could the Government Act as Coordinator?
In Avchala, in the middle of nowhere, you might be surprised to find the busy “Craftsmen’s City” or “Khelosnebis Kalaki” as it is called in Georgian. It is built on a 4-ha plot where there used to be a large carpet manufacturing plant in Soviet times, which vanished with the Soviet Union and turned into a concrete carcass surrounded by a swamp.
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Crime and Punishment. The Georgian Version
Driving back home after a two-week family vacation in Turkey, a horrific surprise awaited us at the border-crossing in Vale (near Akhaltsikhe). We arrived just before midnight on Saturday, August 26, 2017. What we knew to be a very efficient procedure lasted much longer than the expected 2-3 minutes.
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Economic Freedom (Act): Do We Need It or Not?
The so-called “Economic Freedom Act” (EFA), which has been a matter of public discussion in recent weeks, refers to two pieces of legislation: (i) a Constitutional amendment from 2010, which requires a referendum for introducing new taxes or increasing the tax rate, and (ii) the Law on Economic Freedom (2011), in force since 2013, setting a number of additional restrictions to government fiscal policy (Table 1).
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Make Kutaisi Great Again!
Have you ever heard about a mysterious law that predicts the size of a city? If you tell me the population of the largest city in a country, I can tell you the size of the second and third-biggest cities. In 1949, George Zipf came up with the simple theory called the rank-size rule, or “Zipf 's law.” Applied to the size of cities, this law says that the second city and following smaller cities should represent a proportion of the largest city.
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