ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Nov
21

Agricultural Cooperatives Fishing for Competitiveness

Located in a beautiful gorge between Nabeghlavi and Bakhmaro, Chkhakaura village is home to tough Guruli trout fishermen. The village is difficult to reach even in a sturdy 4x4 SUV, but this does not prevent locals from taking advantage of dilapidated Soviet infrastructure and unique natural conditions to grow trout. They are five men, ages 20 to 45, who have been in joint trout farming business for more than 4 years, selling fish, roe and fry in the nearby Nabeghlavi and Bakhmaro villages. Nabeghlavi and Bakhmaro happen to be premier Georgian mineral wa...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent Comments
Guest — Eric Livny
Yes, a new government agency created to register farmer coops...
Saturday, 22 November 2014 12:12 AM
Guest — RT
Is ACDA an agency of the Georgian government?
Friday, 21 November 2014 9:09 PM
Guest — Sulkhan Khalvashi
Dear Eric,Can you share "Samegobro 2014”'s contact information?I represent the company who is interested in buying products from l... Read More
Monday, 24 November 2014 12:12 PM
Continue reading
4082
8 Comments
Write a Comment
Nov
14

The Spinning of Georgia’s Political Carousel, 2004-2014

The sacking of Irakli Alasania, Georgia’s Defense Minister since October 2012, sent shock waves through the country’s political system. But it should not have. After all, Alasania is one of 9 incumbents in this key ministry since 2004. Moreover, with 2 years and one month in office he is tied for second place with David Kezerashvili as the longest serving Minister of Defense after Bacho Akhalaia (2 years and 11 months). Fourth on the list is Irakli Okruashvili (one year and 11 months). All other ministers served between 3 and 8 months. Neither should Ala...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent Comments
Guest — Eric Livny
My use of the Laffer curve metaphor was in no way meant to suggest that tax revenue maximization should be anybody's objective. Go... Read More
Friday, 14 November 2014 3:03 PM
Guest — Simon Appleby
An oft-ignored aspect of the Laffer Curve is that a government's objective should not necessarily be to maximise tax revenue. A co... Read More
Friday, 14 November 2014 2:02 PM
Guest — Edith
It is funny to see Georgians striving so hard to be a liberal democracy when America is still autocratic. So in a sense, they've d... Read More
Sunday, 16 November 2014 2:02 AM
Continue reading
2211
3 Comments
Write a Comment
Nov
03

Georgia Needs Punitive Damages

A few days ago, I was walking in Kostava Street towards the Philharmony when I passed a construction site that was separated from the sidewalk by a wooden fence. Suddenly, I heard the ugly sound of fabric torn apart. Yes, it had happened! My nice winter coat was ripped up by a rusty nail that stuck out of the fence, causing a huge hole in the coat that went down to the lining. Was it my own fault? Well, it was already dark and the nail could hardly be seen, and I was speaking with somebody walking next to me. Therefore, I think I am innocent. One rather ...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent Comments
Guest — Rayray
The same applied to unfixed roads. We live near Gogebashvili St which has been drugged up for weeks (mind you the road was fine!) ... Read More
Monday, 03 November 2014 12:12 PM
Guest — purposefulorg
AND you could get tetanus from a rusty nail if it tears your skin. About Gogebashvili, Rayray is being nice--that road has been t... Read More
Monday, 03 November 2014 2:02 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Jeff, sounds like good news, not bad. Ripped coats, or ripped shoulders, somebody should be held responsible for rusty nails and u... Read More
Tuesday, 04 November 2014 7:07 AM
Continue reading
1864
7 Comments
Write a Comment
Oct
24

Tourism and Rural Development: The Case of Tusheti

In Georgia, it’s often said that tavisupleba mxolod mtebshia – freedom is only in the mountains. Indeed, the mountains have long shielded the small Georgian nation from much larger invaders, helping it maintain its freedom, as well as its unique culture, language and faith. Even today, getting into Georgia’s mountains is no easy task. Separated from the ‘mainland’ by the 3,000m high Abano pass, Tusheti, is an excellent case in point. The sheer ‘outworldliness’ of Tusheti, as well as its well-preserved indigenous traditions and architecture, are a powerfu...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent comment in this post
Guest — Zurab Garakanidze
There is a huge potential for the development of the trekking tourism in Georgia in general, and in Tusheti particularly. We have ... Read More
Sunday, 26 October 2014 7:07 AM
Continue reading
4833
1 Comment
Write a Comment
Oct
10

How Much Regulation Does a Country Need?

Democracy and Freedom Watch reported October 9, that “Georgia’s controversial new immigration law may be changed”. The law, writes DFW, “has caused a wave of confusion and irritation in the country’s expat community. Prime Minister Irakli Gharibashvili … told journalists that if any defects become apparent after the enactment of the new law, ‘we’ll surely correct it.” Just a month earlier, confusion, irritation and public outrage were caused by another piece of Georgian legislation – a law greatly limiting the sales of non-prescription drugs (see Florian...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent Comments
Guest — Simon Appleby
The beloved Politician's Logical Fallacy at work......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vidzkYnaf6Y
Friday, 10 October 2014 12:12 PM
Guest — Y
Wise statesmen listen as much as they act. Moreover, they learn to listen before they act. This is a matter of accumulating politi... Read More
Friday, 10 October 2014 1:01 PM
Continue reading
2263
2 Comments
Write a Comment
Oct
03

Pride and Prejudice in Georgian Food Consumption

GEORGIAN “SUPRAS” AND POVERTY Hospitality is one of the most prized aspects of the Georgian culture. Welcoming (literal translation: "respecting") guests is a matter of great pride for any family. My mother grew up in a small Imeretian village, and as she tells me, the kids of the family were not allowed to eat until the guests were fully "respected", i.e. properly fed. Even the poorest household in the village would go out of its way (and income) to impress its guests with a cornucopia of local delicacies, meats, veggies, and homemade wine. To this day,...
Rate this blog entry:
Recent Comments
Guest — Zurab Garakanidze
'...every third household reports difficulties in access to food (in contrast with every 5th urban household)' ----------- It is n... Read More
Monday, 06 October 2014 5:05 AM
Guest — Nino Doghonadze
Dear Zurab, of course, your point is legitimate for any extensive research on this topic. In this short article the main issue was... Read More
Saturday, 11 October 2014 2:02 PM
Continue reading
3081
2 Comments
Write a Comment

Our Partners