ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Mar
13

Save the Georgian Bazaar!

Open-air markets, so called bazaars, are considered by many Georgians to be relics of the past. Progressive people buy in supermarkets with all its amenities: clean areas, shiny floors, the temperature regulated at a convenient level, the products placed in order and often arranged tastefully. Only backward people buy in a bazaar if there is a supermarket available. This shift in shoppers’ preferences is illustrated by changes in the market structure. Five years ago the only big supermarket in Tbilisi was Goodwill, but the presence of supermarkets increa...
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Guest — Robert Morger
I agree totally. Also bazaar and street market make a city attraktive and unique, if I could not buy my greens, fruits and puri i... Read More
Friday, 13 March 2015 5:05 PM
Guest — megiddo02
Thank you, Adam. I am a pessimist by nature, and so I think that the two-track regulatory system could easily bring about all kind... Read More
Saturday, 14 March 2015 5:05 PM
Guest — Adam
Bazaars and the smaller street-side marketplaces play a huge role in Georgia's economy (especially in the regions), so it's good t... Read More
Saturday, 14 March 2015 1:01 AM
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Feb
10

David the Economist (Repost from July 5th, 2013)

  In 1122, King David IV. reconquered Tbilisi from the Muslims. In those times, a bloodbath among the former oppressors would have been the logical consequence of such a victory. Leaders of the High Middle Ages took merciless revenge against their enemies once they had defeated them. Yet David did not! To the contrary, he did not only let the former rulers live, but David was even anxious that the Muslim population might leave Tbilisi after the fall of the city. In order to send a strong signal of appreciation and friendship to the Muslim population...
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Guest — zviad bakhurauli
thanks for this article. ) economy of small countris like georgia are very different to big ones and it needs an individual approa... Read More
Saturday, 06 July 2013 12:12 AM
Guest — Lasha
Many thanks to authors for this wonderful blog. Now I know King David the Economist. I wish Georgian policy makers read this and t... Read More
Saturday, 06 July 2013 12:12 AM
Guest — KingOfKolchis
This is a very nice piece and would be particularly useful to feed into popular economic policy debate. To this end, would be grea... Read More
Monday, 08 July 2013 2:02 AM
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Feb
03

Does Competition Spoil People?

Many of the influential critics of capitalism shared a sentiment that life under competitive pressure is not good for human beings. Marx felt deep uneasiness about the fact that workers have to “sell” their workforce -- he feared that this would contribute to “alienation” between the worker and their work. One of the main objectives of the Socialist society was therefore to create a new kind of human, a human who would not compete with others in the market arenas and who would not be driven by selfish motives. Rather, the human grown in Socialism would c...
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Guest — tbilisipr
Great piece, indeed we can still observe early stage economics and marketing in practice with many sectors - not least the food se... Read More
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 7:07 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Andrew, I tend to agree with many of your points. Indeed, competition and "markets" are not the only (and not always the best) mec... Read More
Wednesday, 04 February 2015 10:10 AM
Guest — Andrew Parkinson
Yes, competition between restaurants, bakeries, shops, etc. is largely a good thing, but that is hardly a particularly novel obser... Read More
Tuesday, 03 February 2015 7:07 PM
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Jan
20

Farmers without Verve

During the last three months, the Agricultural Policy Research Center (APRC) of ISET-PI was working on a study about family farming in Georgia. Within this project, we conducted interviews with farmers and owners of agribusinesses. These interviews elicited many intriguing facets of Georgian agriculture, but one aspect I found particularly interesting was that Georgian farmers apparently have a rather negative view on agricultural jobs. In Samtskhe-Javakheti we were told the story of a middle-age unemployed man who was offered a job as a shepherd by anot...
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Guest — Nino
Congratulations on the first piece, Salome! Attitudes are indeed an important aspect of agriculture in Georgia. However, I would s... Read More
Thursday, 22 January 2015 2:02 PM
Guest — Salome
Dear Koka, Thanks for reading my blog and commenting on it. Very good point about culture and stereotypes. Culture plays a huge ro... Read More
Thursday, 22 January 2015 6:06 PM
Guest — Koka
"Many young people would prefer to stay unemployed and spend the whole day at so called “birzhas” in their villages (outdoor place... Read More
Thursday, 22 January 2015 4:04 PM
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Dec
22

Did the Patriarch Cause a Baby Boom in Georgia?

In October 2007, responding to the problem of very low birthrates in the country, Ilia II. of Georgia, the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, announced that he would personally baptize any third and subsequent child born to Orthodox families from that time onwards. This promise seems to have had a considerable impact on the reproduction behavior of Georgians. According to the National Statistics Office of Georgia (NSOG), the number of births increased from about 49,000 in 2007 to about 57,000 in 2008 and 63,000 in 2009. This is a remarkable 28% increas...
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Guest — Simon Appleby
It is a very interesting article. Certainly economic growth creates favourable conditions for people to marry and start families, ... Read More
Monday, 22 December 2014 7:07 PM
Guest — Lasha Lanchava
Thank you Simon. Great point regarding marriage rates. It is in fact possible to compare number of marriages before and after the ... Read More
Wednesday, 24 December 2014 3:03 AM
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Dec
19

Bringing Light to Georgia’s Darkest Corners

Nodar Dumbadze has a reputation for bringing tears and laughs out of his readers. Yet, when watching his “Hellados” performed in the tiny municipal “Culture House” in Terjola, we were laughing and crying not only in appreciation of Dumbadze's rare ability to weave tragedy and comedy into a single narrative. We were certainly moved by Dumbadze’s story of teenagers growing up in the tough multiethnic environment of Sukhumi, the love-hate relationship between the Georgian Jemal and the Greek Ianguli, and their ultimate love for their homeland. But, perhaps ...
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Guest — mfmsm
It had it. It was called TLG. It was removed for reasons no-one understood, and replaced with a simulacrum. Voila tout.
Friday, 19 December 2014 7:07 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Thanks, Simon! This is a wonderful example... I am familiar with a few others. Israel used to give young people (particularly wome... Read More
Friday, 19 December 2014 11:11 PM
Guest — Simon Appleby
After the Second World War, Australian higher education, although almost totally state-run, was run on a full cost-recovery basis.... Read More
Friday, 19 December 2014 10:10 PM
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