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COVID-19 in Georgia's Agriculture: a challenge, an opportunity or both?
01 February 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to widespread economic distress in many countries around the world. For the first time since 2009, the world’s gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to have declined in 2020. Alongside other sectors of the economy, such impacts are also being felt by the food and agricultural sector. The pandemic has affected food security and nutrition, supply chains, food and livestock production, and food safety.

December 2020 | CCI: The COVID pandemic dampens New Year celebrations
01 February 2021

Confidence is retreating after a recovery that lasted about 6 months. Last month, in spite of a slight decline of the CCI, we could hold on to the belief that we had reached a plateau in the recovery from the low numbers observed last April.

January 2021 GDP Forecast | GDP growth projections for 2020 currently at -5.5%, but a two month lockdown means more bad news for growth are yet to come
25 January 2021

The real GDP growth rate amounted to -7.7% year-on-year for November 2020. Consequently, the estimated real GDP for the first eleven months of 2020 was -5.9%. Recently, Geostat has released its preliminary estimate of real GDP growth for the third quarter of 2020. The Q3 growth rate was -5.6% (down by 0.5 ppt relative to the forecast).

May Certain Trends Brought By COVID-19 Be Worth Keeping Post-Pandemic?
11 January 2021

The pandemic has taken an enormous toll on human lives and health globally. It has severely impacted the socio-economic state of millions of households, bringing immeasurable human tragedy, paralysis of social connectivity, economic crisis, and, to a certain extent, culture shock.

Enguri HPP Is Closing While Demand on Abkhazia’s Side Keeps Growing: Challenges and Opportunities for The Georgia’s Electricity Sector at the Beginning Of 2021
28 December 2020

According to the last four years’ data, Georgia has a chronic electricity deficit in ten months out of twelve, with the country showing an electricity surplus only in May and June (and, occasionally, in April and/or July). Despite the COVID-19 crisis dampening electricity demand in the country, 2020 was no exception. After two months – May and June – characterized by a positive generation-consumption gap, starting from July 2020 Georgia has been generating less electricity than required to cover consumption.

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