ISET

The next energy revolution is on our doorstep, and it is going to be driven by renewable power generation technologies, which potentially allow for a much more decentralized power system and a less heavy network. Still, power transmission network projects worth USD 40 trillion are being financed through different state and private investments all around the world. Mr. Michael Delphia, Senior Energy expert at USAID’s Governing for Growth Project discussed the concept of market-centered energy planning (M-CEP) with the ISET community at an open lecture. Throughout his career, Mr. Delphia has spent around 20 years in the US energy industry and has supported power and gas reforms in over 70 countries around the world.

ISET is proud to announce that resident faculty member Norberto Pignatti has recently become research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), a private, independent research institute based in Bonn (Germany), which conducts nationally and internationally-oriented labor market research. IZA runs the world's largest research network in economic science, comprising over 1,300 international Research Fellows and Affiliates, as well as Policy Fellows from business, politics, society and the media. IZA is an international research institute and a place for communication between academic science, politics, and economic practice.

Congestion in electricity transmission systems is a common problem all around the world, Georgia included. Two types of congestion are observed in the power sector; physical and economic. Physical congestion occurs when a transmission system is not adequate to supply an increasing amount of electricity. Economic congestion appears when prices in one region are different from those in another region, while cheaper electricity cannot be sold to the region with high prices. Both types of congestion are problematic for Georgia.

Physical congestion is prevalent in Georgia because electricity is heavily used in the eastern part of the country, while most power plants are in the west (such as large HPPs). Economic congestion occurs because cheap electricity in western Georgia cannot always be delivered to eastern Georgia, where power plants produce more expensive electricity.

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