ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus by ISET
Jun
27

We'll Take Our Countries Back and Make Them Great Again!

For the likes of Boris Johnson, currently UK’s most popular politician and a leading figure of the Brexit revolt, “The European Union has become too remote, too opaque and not accountable enough to the people it is meant to serve.” But how about the UK itself? How close are 10 Downing Street or Westminster to the working class folks of England’s industrial north? How representative is Britain’s Eton-educated ‘political class’ of the people they are meant to serve? And if Boris Johnson is lauding the British people for deciding to take control of their ow...
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Levan Pavlenishvili
a revolt against patronizing ‘experts’, traditional political parties, and, generally, Britain’s social and economic elites. - th... Read More
Monday, 27 June 2016 11:11 AM
Martin Smith
What follows your magnificent end I only just noticed. It is totally superfluous and far from being in the same top league as the ... Read More
Monday, 27 June 2016 12:12 PM
Simon Appleby
Brexit should not be seen as a lifting of the drawbridge and Britains isolation from the world. Britain, the worlds 6th biggest ec... Read More
Monday, 27 June 2016 2:02 PM
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Jul
24

Exclusive Interview with Professor Matthias Matthijs: Greece and the Eurozone Crisis

Today I’m sitting down for a conversation across a continent and an ocean. Our guest is Professor Matthias Matthijs of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He is the editor of the renowned and timely book “The Future of the Euro,” and two-time recipient of the Max M. Fisher award for excellence in teaching at SAIS. We will be talking about the Eurozone crisis and the lessons other small-state economies and their policymakers can learn from Greece’s unfortunate situation. Q. Professor Matthijs, thank you for sitting down...
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Mar
21

The Crisis in Ukraine and the Georgian Economy

When Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovich decided not to sign the association agreement with the European Union and instead opted for a Russian package of long-term economic support, many Ukrainians perceived this not to be a purely economic decision.  Rather, they feared this to be a renunciation of Western cultural and political values, and – to put it mildly – were not happy about this development. The Russian political system, characterized by a prepotent president, constrained civil rights, and a government controlling important parts of the e...
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Jun
03

Riding the Dragon

Cultural and intellectual achievements herald economic success of a people, and the Chinese cultural and intellectual heritage is breathtaking. The Chinese discovered gunpowder, the compass, and the movable type printing press long before the Europeans. Admiral Zheng He’s fleet reached Mogadishu and Mombasa with up to 28,000 sailors at the same time when the Europeans set out to discover Africa with crews of not more than 300 sailors. Temporarily lamed by Mao and his followers, capitalism has unleashed the dragon once again! China is about to become the ...
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Guest — Eric Livny
A very interesting undertaking, thanks for posting. There is a development theory attributed to Alexander Gershenkron (http://en.w... Read More
Monday, 03 June 2013 10:10 AM
Guest — Simon Appleby
Good to see this analysis, well done. Xinjiang Hualing is a private company, albeit with close connections to the Chinese governme... Read More
Monday, 03 June 2013 10:10 AM
Guest — M
There is a history of Chinese immigration into Georgia jumpstarting domestic industries: "[...] a tea-specialist named Liu Junzhou... Read More
Monday, 03 June 2013 12:12 PM
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Apr
12

Progress Through Immigration

Georgia has one of the most liberal immigration policies worldwide. Everybody can enter Georgia with an airport visa that is valid for one year. Permanent residency status is granted as soon as one has found employment. Yet compared to other capitals, one encounters rather few foreigners when walking through Tbilisi’s streets. How can Georgia sustain its liberal policy without being overrun by immigrants? There are two rather trivial reasons. Firstly, there is no incentive to “immigrate into the welfare state”, simply because Georgia does not have one. A...
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Guest — Simon Appleby
A very interesting and well researched article. It is good to hear some arguments in favour of migration from Georgian academics.T... Read More
Saturday, 13 April 2013 10:10 AM
Guest — Florian
You added highly interesting facts. Indeed, when Isabella and Ferdinand expelled the Jews of Spain, this qualifies as the first br... Read More
Saturday, 13 April 2013 6:06 PM
Guest — Eric
As I wrote in Georgian Driving Manners and Economic Competitiveness, "there may be something about the country and its people that... Read More
Saturday, 13 April 2013 10:10 PM
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Nov
09

On Democratization and Growth - Once Again

A long season of high–stakes elections in Georgia, Ukraine, and now the United States is finally over. Once the last campaign posters are taken down, we may as well start asking: now what? Whether we like to admit it or not, the success of democracy is probably ill measured by the show of competitive campaigns or the transparency of the voting system. Instead, the success largely depends on how informed and engaged in the political process the general public remains after the elections. This is something Ukraine has discovered the hard way sinc...
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Guest — Zak
Interesting. The right panel of the is indeed intriguing. I had a quick glance at the paper and I was wondering how much is the au... Read More
Friday, 09 November 2012 12:12 PM
Guest — Yasya
Zak, I think the time dependence problem is mitigated a bit by the fact that he is using relative growth rates (single-year growth... Read More
Friday, 09 November 2012 10:10 PM
Guest — Eric
I am not sure that taking such a long-term perspective is a good idea. First, the nature of democracy has changed over time. What ... Read More
Saturday, 10 November 2012 3:03 PM
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