ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Nov
21

Structural Transformation in Georgia – In the Right Direction at a Turtle’s Pace

  Structural transformation of the economy is one of the most important determinants of economic development. Almost invariably, nations that have managed to pull themselves out of poverty were able to diversify their economies away from low productivity sectors. In advanced countries, productivity differences between sectors are generally small, and growth mostly happens because of productivity improvements within sectors. Developing countries, on the other hand, are characterized by large productivity gaps between the sectors of their economies. ...
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Irakli Shalikashvili
It is a great peace to help you find out what the structural decomposition looks like in Georgia and how productivity of sectors a... Read More
Tuesday, 13 December 2016 11:11 AM
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Nov
14

Georgian Haves and Have-Nots. Who’s to Blame and What to Do?

Just like the World Bank’s Doing Business, Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index and many other international rankings, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development’s (EBRD) Transition Reports have typically carried a very positive message for Georgia, Eastern Europe’s poster child of transition since the Rose Revolution of 2003. This year’s Transition Report, launched last week in Tbilisi by Alexander Plekhanov, EBRD’s Deputy Director of Research, is somewhat exceptional in this regard. Subtitled “Equal opportunities in an un...
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May
08

What Kind of "State" Does a Country Need?

When Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko visited Georgia in late April 2015, we were once again reminded that history is not over yet, certainly not in the sense pronounced by Francis Fukuyama in his 1992 book End of History and the Last Man: "What we may be witnessing is not just the end of the Cold War, or the passing of a particular period of post-war history, but the end of history as such: that is, the end point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human go...
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Guest — Eric Livny
As argued by Gerard Roland and Yuri Gorodnichenko (http://www.voxeu.org/article/role-culture-democratisation#.VVVpJDjFegQ.facebook... Read More
Friday, 15 May 2015 11:11 AM
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Nov
17

Kakha Bendukidze. End of an Epoch?

  The post-communist world lost one of its greatest sons last week – a freedom fighter who devoted his life to the daunting task of cleansing Eastern Europe and Eurasia from the shackles of Soviet thinking and bureaucracy. Like Che Guevara before him, Big Kakha’s legacy transcends national borders. His crusade for liberty and human dignity took him in 2004 from Russia to Georgia, and – in the last year of his life – from Georgia to Ukraine. He was eager to help revolutionaries and reformers all over the world, not sparing his time, money and effort...
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Guest — Sanjit
Extremely well written article in an area that is the author's forte. We often write best the stuff we know best.
Monday, 17 November 2014 4:04 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Good points, Helene... One could perhaps claim that thanks to Kakha we are starting from clean slate But I agree with your point ... Read More
Monday, 17 November 2014 8:08 PM
Guest — Helene Ryding
Only one problem with what Bendukidze was doing. The removal of many old regulations, only for the EU to insist on bringing in so... Read More
Monday, 17 November 2014 7:07 PM
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Nov
07

From Soviet to Post-Soviet Consumerism

In a sense, life was relatively simple back in the Soviet Union days. Consumers had few choices, and material aspirations were limited to the unholy trinity of “apartment, car and dacha”. That said, homo Sovieticus spent enormous amounts of time and energy in chasing material goods ranging from potatoes to nylon stockings and cars. A part of Soviet consumer behavior was about satisfying basic needs (as in the potatoes example above). But there was a discernible element of conspicuous consumption as well. Possession of a luxurious Pobeda car was deemed an...
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Guest — Levan Pavlenishvili
In my undergraduate years one of my lecturers was ex prime-minister of Georgian SSR, Mr. Nodar Chitanava who appears to be a neigh... Read More
Thursday, 13 November 2014 10:10 AM
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