ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Feb
06

New Labor Migration Law – Homemade Explosive Device in the Making

LEGISLATING GEORGIA’S WAY INTO THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY – LESSONS FROM RECENT HISTORY On September 1, 2014, the Georgian society woke up to a very unpleasant reality – after years of extremely welcoming visa regime which put the country on the map as an attractive tourist and foreign direct investment destination, a new migration law regulating foreigners admission and stay in Georgia came into effect. Business owners, foreign students, employees of large and small companies, and even residents of Georgia’s border areas found themselves in a very uncertain...
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Guest — Hans Gutbrod
I do think this is ISET's moment, when it would be great if mobilize full-out -- and help reframe the debate on this issue. I am V... Read More
Friday, 06 February 2015 2:02 PM
Guest — Betsy Haskell
AmCham is working hard on this. I mentioned to George Welton, the new Executive Director, that in order to persuade the Millenium... Read More
Friday, 06 February 2015 2:02 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Great food for thought, dear Lasha! Many thanks... I only hope someone is taking note and thinking. A message I got just now from ... Read More
Friday, 06 February 2015 3:03 PM
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Nov
28

Career Guidance for Unemployed Georgians

One of the most puzzling aspects of the Georgian labor market is what is known as the “qualification mismatch”. While unemployment is high, many positions remain vacant due to a lack of qualified applicants. There is plenty of casual evidence that there is such a mismatch. Recently, a World Bank delegation we hosted at ISET reported about a meeting they had with Georgian entrepreneurs. One of those businessmen, active in the construction sector, was bringing welders from Turkey to Tbilisi, paying them extraordinarily high salaries (Turkish wage level plu...
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Guest — mfmsm
There should be vocational options available especially for boys from age fourteen or so, and the ability to migrate into vocation... Read More
Friday, 28 November 2014 6:06 PM
Guest — Hans Gutbrod
ok, I like the general idea, and I agree that carpenters, welders, and plumbers plus a number of other skilled workers could do we... Read More
Friday, 28 November 2014 6:06 PM
Guest — Oliver Reisner
The right link is http://www.worknet.gov.ge/
Saturday, 29 November 2014 2:02 PM
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Oct
10

How Much Regulation Does a Country Need?

Democracy and Freedom Watch reported October 9, that “Georgia’s controversial new immigration law may be changed”. The law, writes DFW, “has caused a wave of confusion and irritation in the country’s expat community. Prime Minister Irakli Gharibashvili … told journalists that if any defects become apparent after the enactment of the new law, ‘we’ll surely correct it.” Just a month earlier, confusion, irritation and public outrage were caused by another piece of Georgian legislation – a law greatly limiting the sales of non-prescription drugs (see Florian...
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Guest — Simon Appleby
The beloved Politician's Logical Fallacy at work......https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vidzkYnaf6Y
Friday, 10 October 2014 12:12 PM
Guest — Y
Wise statesmen listen as much as they act. Moreover, they learn to listen before they act. This is a matter of accumulating politi... Read More
Friday, 10 October 2014 1:01 PM
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Sep
26

Georgia’s New Immigration Law: Many Losers and no Winners

This year, the International School of Economics at Tbilisi State University (ISET) admitted nine Armenian students and one from Azerbaijan. They came to Tbilisi for a preparation course in August and all of them applied for residency permits before the first of September. All applications were exactly identical. Out of ten students, seven got their permits, two were denied, and one is still in process. The reasons for rejection were stated in most general terms, relating to Article 18 of the new immigration law. That article reads:  “An alien may b...
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Guest — Ali
once the reputation of a country is damaged, it could not be corrected for many many years. I am seeing lots of my friends who had... Read More
Friday, 26 September 2014 2:02 PM
Guest — Y
Who benefits? The bureaucrats with a newfound sense of "purpose" in their lives.
Friday, 26 September 2014 11:11 AM
Guest — Steven Hermans
Georgia was an easy place to stay. It now became like everywhere else: Europe, Central Asia, US,...
Friday, 26 September 2014 11:11 AM
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Sep
19

The Puzzle of Poverty and Wages in Georgia

POVERTY PERSISTING… Any Georgian growing up in the “dark” 1990s (a literally dark, and rather gloomy period in the recent history of our country) would remember the canned milk powder distributed, together with some other goodies, to families with children aged below 5. These black and white cans were often used as flower pots in many of these families… Being a kid from that dark age, one author of this blog was surprised to discover that, according to the World Bank’s poverty estimations, Georgia is doing worse today than it did then...
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Guest — Eric Livny
Just to get people to work would be a major achievement. When I see my 30 y.o. neighbor (former rugby player) watching TV all day ... Read More
Friday, 19 September 2014 2:02 PM
Guest — Florian Biermann
Interesting article. Rising poverty is not unusual when a country develops (Kuznets Curve). The problematic incentives set by soci... Read More
Friday, 19 September 2014 12:12 PM
Guest — Aaron Erlich (@aserlich)
I think what the studies of worker programs in Western context miss in a place like Georgia is that so many folks have been unempl... Read More
Friday, 19 September 2014 2:02 PM
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Sep
16

Who Defends the Workman’s Interests?

Assume you want to buy tomatoes at a vegetable market in Tbilisi. At a booth, you see beautiful tomatoes of flawless quality, red, fleshy, and shiny. Right next to them are offered semi-rotten tomatoes with corky blotches, but to your surprise, both kinds of tomatoes are tagged with the very same price. “Something wrong with this seller”, you may think and buy the shiny tomatoes. When we speak about market failure in economics, we usually mean that the economy is in a situation in which we can make everybody better off without making anybody worse. A sta...
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