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ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Feb
01

Rethinking Medical Residency Programs in Georgia

According to the Law of Georgia on Medical Activity[1], postgraduate medical education can take place only in accredited institutions and/or medical schools from March 2009 onwards. This seems to be a good initiative. Presumably, the goals of this law were to promote higher quality education for future doctors in the country and to deliver higher quality healthcare to the population of Georgia. These are relevant goals, of course, as the life of a human being in terms of both length and quality is and should be the most serious concern for every country....
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Guest — Lasha
Yap, Regulators are those Guys, who know how to make decision about quality/quantity
Saturday, 02 February 2013 2:02 PM
Guest — Nino
I think I understood your point, Lasha Nevertheless, I would love to believe badly that to some extent these decisions will serve ... Read More
Sunday, 03 February 2013 11:11 AM
Guest — Lasha
I would love to believe that you can believe something more creative If you have time have a look at works of Stigler, Petztzman,... Read More
Monday, 04 February 2013 2:02 AM
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Nov
23

Math Education – an Engine of Economic Growth in the 21st Century

  MATH EDUCATION AND GROWTH: RECENT EVIDENCE Mathematical literacy has always been a key factor in improving a country’s productivity and competitiveness. Stanford University’s Eric Hanushek has shown that there is a positive relationship between students’ performance in mathematics tests and economic growth. This is not at all surprising. Proficiency in math implies a high-level of cognitive skills among the labour force, in other words a high quality of human capital, which leads to technological innovation and productivity gains. Another more re...
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Guest — Archil
Givi, Good review! I do agree with you that we need to prioritize mathematics; There is a myth in the west that Georgians are good... Read More
Friday, 23 November 2012 8:08 PM
Guest — Maka
Nice post and interesting relationship. I hope new government will joint PISA again and we will be able to monitor changes in Geor... Read More
Friday, 23 November 2012 8:08 PM
Guest — Michael
How do you control for endogeneity in these kinds of studies?
Friday, 23 November 2012 10:10 PM
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Oct
15

“Invisible Hand“ in the Georgian Preschool Education Sector

The private provision of childcare in Georgia’s cities has been on the rise during the last few years as is especially evident in the capital. Many of the new private kindergartens (KG) are said to provide very good quality services, helping enrich the set of preschool educational choices available to parents (or, rather, their children). Private KGs may be quite a bit more expensive relative to the public alternative, yet their share of the market is increasing over time, suggesting that more and more Georgian families are willing to pay a premium for b...
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Guest — Matsatso
I really enjoyed not only this interesting article, but the cover photo too In fact, there is being introduced some differentia... Read More
Monday, 15 October 2012 3:03 PM
Guest — Nino
Thank you, Matsatso. I guess your sister's story is true for many other parents also who chose private over public KG. Whether it ... Read More
Monday, 15 October 2012 5:05 PM
Guest — Michael
Are there queues for public kindergartens in Georgia? If yes it might explain a part of the price differential.
Monday, 15 October 2012 7:07 PM
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Sep
05

Who Is Able To Afford A Khachapuri?

As reported in our Khachapuri Index Column, the prices of key khachapuri ingredients have started rising in July, given their strong correlation with the annual cycle of agricultural production in Georgia. A standard portion of Imeretian khachapuri can now be cooked at slightly more than 3GEL, on average. Now, while 3GEL does not sound like a lot for the expats and the better off Georgians, it may be beyond reach for many of the less fortunate Georgian households. To remind ourselves: about 9.2% of Georgia’s population (close to 400,000 people) are ...
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Jul
17

A personal view on why people “choose” to get higher education in Georgia

Putting “choose” in quotation marks is the main part of the title and a hint to my subjective view on the issue to be discussed in this post. Based on my own experience and on the experience of my friends and acquaintances I came to the conclusion that most Georgian youths do not autonomously choose to get higher education, rather their choice is made directly by their parents. This is the case when parents impose their will upon their children. This is a case of paternalism, which means imposing your own will upon another person for his/her own good. Th...
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Guest — RT
Is "not allowing somebody to decide until he is 20" not paternalistic?
Tuesday, 17 July 2012 6:06 PM
Guest — Leqso
Hi,thanks for the nice post, the topic is very actual for Georgia, I think,I agree that most of the students are not mature enough... Read More
Tuesday, 17 July 2012 7:07 PM
Guest — Eric
Very much agree with Giorgi's analysis and Leqso's "policy" suggestions. Basic schooling, starting with the elementary level, shou... Read More
Thursday, 19 July 2012 10:10 AM
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Apr
24

The "Over-Education" Trap

In recent years, many countries in Europe and the former Soviet Union have seen an explosion in university enrollment. During approximately 10 years (from 1999 until 2010) higher education enrollment increased by 64% in Central and Eastern Europe, 27% in Central Asia and South Caucasus, and 19% in Western Europe and North America (see UNESCO).     1999-2005 2005-2010 1999-2010 Low enrollment  level in 1999  (below 30$) Country ...
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Guest — RT
Very true. One should add high unemployment. With no job, youth would either head to streets or to colleges. So those with ambitio... Read More
Tuesday, 24 April 2012 6:06 PM
Guest — Salome
Yes, at some point I agree with you and dear RT. We have too look from another direction. High unemployment and economic crisis c... Read More
Tuesday, 24 April 2012 7:07 PM
Guest — Randy
While it is certainly true that there are some worthless programs in the region, these numbers need to be carefully analyzed befor... Read More
Thursday, 26 April 2012 11:11 PM
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