ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.
Nov
15

Troubles to Cooperate in Georgian Agriculture

Georgian agriculture was more developed in Soviet times as it is today. Despite great overall technological progress almost everywhere in the last 20 years, Georgia moved backward when it comes to agriculture. In the year 1990, at the end of the Soviet Union, the number of cattle exceeded 4 million, while today it is just a little more than 1 million. In the Soviet Union, Georgia was a main producer of tea, citrus fruits, deciduous trees, and vine. According to the Rural Poverty Portal, after the collapse of the Soviet Union the output of some of these g...
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Guest — Juan Echanove
Baselines and studies about farmers' cooperation in GeorgiaIn preparation of the ENPARD, the EU, in collaboration with FAO, produc... Read More
Friday, 15 November 2013 12:12 PM
Guest — Simon Appleby
You make a good point about very small co-operative ventures based on blood relatives as members. In my experience these are succe... Read More
Friday, 15 November 2013 4:04 PM
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Oct
28

The Georgian Solution to the Tragedy of the Commons

In Georgia today and in Europe in the past, villages owned pastures where every shepherd and cattle-herder in the community could take his animals. Grazing on these pastures was free and unrestricted. This land, owned by all villagers jointly, is traditionally referred to as the “commons” (in the last years, the term has been extended to also refer to free-to-use internet content). The access to common land is unregulated, and consequently the villagers utilize on this resource as much as they can. Due to the heavy overuse, the common land in villages ha...
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Guest — Charmm
Brilliant! Very interesting article interlinking ancient Georgian mythology with the fundamental principles of economics. As famou... Read More
Monday, 28 October 2013 1:01 PM
Guest — Nikoloz
" these property rights were indeed assigned, but not to villagers, but to their gods."In Khevsureti, village Roshka there is a pa... Read More
Tuesday, 29 October 2013 3:03 PM
Guest — COMUS
Very interesting article, enjoyed reading a lot! "The habit of Skoptsy men to castrate themselves may have played a role in their... Read More
Thursday, 31 October 2013 5:05 PM
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Oct
25

Georgia's Democratic Challenge

In his 1991 book “The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century”, the famous American political scientist Samuel Huntington (1927-2008) identifies three global democratization waves in the history of humankind. The first wave was the creation of the classical democracies in the United Kingdom and North America and the ongoing democratization process of the 19th century in France and other European countries. The second democratization wave refers to the time after the Second World War, when some latecomers (Germany, Italy, Spain etc.), jo...
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Guest — makachitanava
Very nice post Ia, however I would like to see more discussions about Georgian case. What can be reasons for Democracy reversal i... Read More
Friday, 25 October 2013 10:10 AM
Guest — Till
It would be interesting to read a blog about how the % of Georgians describing democracy as the best political system has evolved ... Read More
Friday, 25 October 2013 11:11 AM
Guest — Jeff
Setting aside Huntington and Rustow, we may look straight to American history for a parallel. 10 years after the USA elected its ... Read More
Friday, 25 October 2013 4:04 PM
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Oct
19

Assessing the Impact of Development Projects - Looking for a Black Cat in a Dark Room and Hoping that the Cat is There?

Do development projects reach their stated objectives, such as reducing poverty, improving skills, creating jobs, etc.? This turns out to be a complicated question about project impact that a simple before-and-after measurement would not help answering. Why? The answer is also complicated, of course, but here are two points to consider: First, when a country goes through a rapid modernization process, as is arguably the case in Georgia, most development indicators improve over time regardless of specific donor interventions. Second, even if we observe a...
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Sep
30

Dear Police: There is a Bomb. Please Find It!

Evacuation is one of the most frequently used words in Georgian TV in the last two weeks, arguably due to an inflation of fibber bomb warnings. Rustavi 2, Imedi, Parliament, airport, bank offices, and schools – all were targeted by these macabre hoaxes. In the Georgian fairy tale of Liar Shepherd, the young boy lied twice that wolfs were coming. When finally wolfs were really coming, no one believed him anymore. This is one of the main risks of bomb hoaxes – they may lead to something one might call “terrorism fatigue”. Recently, I spoke with somebody wh...
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Guest — Hans G
thank you for bringing economic (and clear) thinking to this issue. I also had to think back to my experience in London during the... Read More
Thursday, 03 October 2013 9:09 PM
Guest — Eric Livny
Thanks for your comment, Hans! Makes a lot of sense
Thursday, 03 October 2013 10:10 PM
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Sep
23

The Most Economical Economic Indicators

Measuring economic developments is often a laborious business. Consider, for example, the Consumer Price Index (CPI). One first has to define the so called consumption basket that contains the goods and services whose prices you want to track. These goods and services have to be represented in the basket in the right proportions, reflecting the consumption patterns of an average consumer. Unfortunately, consumption habits change over time, and product characteristics change even more. A personal computer 10 years ago is obviously a very different object ...
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