ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus by ISET
Dec
04

Your Guest Is My Guest, or Why Tourism Is Not a Zero-Sum Game

The South Caucasus is divided by high mountain ranges, often impassable political borders, and ethnic conflict zones. In addition to three independent states, the region also includes three unrecognized territories. Nakhichevan is separated from Azerbaijan’s mainland by Armenia’s Syunik region. Armenia’s border with Turkey and Azerbaijan, on the other hand, is sealed for political reasons. Though trampled by politics, the economic arguments for greater regional integration in the South Caucasus are truly powerful. For one thing, thanks to its strategic l...
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Simon Appleby
The Vine and Wine Foundation of Armenia recently held its inaugural International Wine Conference in Yerevan, backed by GIZ. Guest... Read More
Saturday, 09 December 2017 7:07 AM
Simon Appleby
An interesting market for Georgia, oddly enough, is the Armenian Diaspora market (around 8 million people). Many diaspora Armenian... Read More
Saturday, 09 December 2017 7:07 AM
Eric Livny
Sounds really interesting, Simon! Ive recently interviewed Ia Tabagari, head of the Georgian kvevri (or natural) wine association,... Read More
Saturday, 09 December 2017 5:05 PM
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May
22

Free or Fearful? The Fear of Floating in the South Caucasus

In economics there is a long-standing debate on whether emerging markets should adopt a fixed exchange rate currency regime or leave their exchange rates up to markets to decide. Intuitively, exchange rate is just another price, similar to the price on a sack of potatoes, a liter of milk or a kilogram of honey. Except that exchange rate is the price of 1 unit of foreign currency (say, 1 US dollar) in terms of our domestic currency. Textbook economics would tell us that price flexibility is essential for markets to function well, to quickly clear up any s...
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Jan
28

Georgia and the Gravity of Migration

Whatever Kim Jong-un’s propaganda says about the greatness of his country, it is a fact that nobody immigrates to North Korea but almost everyone wants to get out. Likewise, whatever conservative Muslims say about the depraved West – there is a huge net migration out of Muslim countries into these rotten and decadent Western societies. And also the “socialist paradises” of the past had to take great efforts to make sure their lucky populations did not leave: the Berlin Wall was built in 1961 because the large-scale drainage of labor threatened Eastern Ge...
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Nov
28

TUMORROW IS ALREADY HERE

Spending a big chunk of their precious summer vacation in Armenia was not exactly my kids’ dream. Their wish list included far more exotic destinations in Africa, the Far East and Europe’s leading capitals – Vienna, Paris or London. And, yet, it did not take too much convincing for them to go on a one-week trial at TUMO’s summer school for creativity in Yerevan. All I had to do was show a few pictures from TUMO’s website: What was supposed to be a one-week trial turned into a four-week immersion into the world of photography, 3D modeling and animation (...
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Nov
07

“Friendship Bridge” – For or Against Gravitation?

The official visit of the Armenian President last week was concluded by a splashy announcement that the building of the “Friendship Bridge,” a new infrastructure project approved by the Georgian and Armenian Governments in late 2014, will start construction in 2017, and will be completed in under two years. The Georgian Prime Minister and the Armenian President have reportedly discussed a range of other opportunities to deepen economic and trade relationship between the two countries and support business community engagement in this process. This excitem...
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Apr
25

Are Working Women Happy Women? View from the Greater Caucasus

“Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence” – Aristotle WHY STUDY HAPPINESS? Already in ancient times philosophers debated the nature of happiness and the recipes for a happy and fulfilling life. Today this question is also hotly debated by scientists and politicians, who are particularly interested in what can be done to increase the happiness of their voters (and citizens, more generally). Happiness has become so important nowadays that four countries: Bhutan, Ecuador, UAE and Venezuela went so...
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Eric Livny
Am curious whether the same data could be used to analyze whether the husbands are happier as a result of their wives working outs... Read More
Tuesday, 26 April 2016 10:10 AM
Nino Doghonadze
This would be very interesting questions to answer. Unfortunately, however, the survey is not collecting data on happiness levels... Read More
Tuesday, 26 April 2016 1:01 PM
Florian Biermann
Why is gender relevant when it comes to the connection between work and happiness? Paid work does not result from a free (unconstr... Read More
Tuesday, 26 April 2016 6:06 PM
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