ISET

ISET Economist Blog

A blog about economics in the South Caucasus.

Nino Doghonadze was born in Kutaisi, Georgia on December 30, 1988. She holds a Master's degree in economics from the International School of Economics at Tbilisi State University (ISET). Nino is a new addition to ISET Policy Institute, as she joined in July 2012. Mrs.Doghonadze is conducting research and providing economic policy consulting. Additionally, she also teaches Principles of Economics at Tbilisi State University's International School of Tourism.

May
22

Europe Wants Georgia. But Not Georgians

In March 2015, 31-year-old Tamar Trapaidze died of severe toxicity in Italy. Like many Georgian women of her generation, Tamar was an illegal immigrant employed as an in-home care worker by an Italian family. Being “illegal”, she must have feared deportation, which is probably why she was unable to receive adequate medical treatment. Despite all the risks it entails, illegal immigration is a key survival strategy for many Georgian families. Since 2002, presumably the best period in Georgia’s recent history, the country has lost 14.7% of its population, m...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
13229
21 Comments
Write a Comment
Feb
03

Does Competition Spoil People?

Many of the influential critics of capitalism shared a sentiment that life under competitive pressure is not good for human beings. Marx felt deep uneasiness about the fact that workers have to “sell” their workforce -- he feared that this would contribute to “alienation” between the worker and their work. One of the main objectives of the Socialist society was therefore to create a new kind of human, a human who would not compete with others in the market arenas and who would not be driven by selfish motives. Rather, the human grown in Socialism would c...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
2645
4 Comments
Write a Comment
Dec
25

Georgia: Exporting Christmas Tree Seeds to Europe and Cutting Trees at Home?

Exporting the seeds of the Nordmann fir – a very popular species grown for Christmas trees – is a thriving and fiercely competitive Georgian industry, perhaps the only one in which Georgia has a near monopoly of the European market. According to an industry expert, more than 80% of all Christmas trees sold in Europe have their origin in Racha (Tlugi and Ambrolauri) and Borjomi forests. In 2013 Georgia exported more than 60 tons of fir tree seeds, with a total value of almost $US 2 million ($32/kg on average). Denmark is the largest buyer of Georgia’...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
4720
0 Comments
Write a Comment
Oct
03

Pride and Prejudice in Georgian Food Consumption

GEORGIAN “SUPRAS” AND POVERTY Hospitality is one of the most prized aspects of the Georgian culture. Welcoming (literal translation: "respecting") guests is a matter of great pride for any family. My mother grew up in a small Imeretian village, and as she tells me, the kids of the family were not allowed to eat until the guests were fully "respected", i.e. properly fed. Even the poorest household in the village would go out of its way (and income) to impress its guests with a cornucopia of local delicacies, meats, veggies, and homemade wine. To this day,...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
2820
2 Comments
Write a Comment
Sep
19

The Puzzle of Poverty and Wages in Georgia

POVERTY PERSISTING… Any Georgian growing up in the “dark” 1990s (a literally dark, and rather gloomy period in the recent history of our country) would remember the canned milk powder distributed, together with some other goodies, to families with children aged below 5. These black and white cans were often used as flower pots in many of these families… Being a kid from that dark age, one author of this blog was surprised to discover that, according to the World Bank’s poverty estimations, Georgia is doing worse today than it did then...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
3606
5 Comments
Write a Comment
Jun
27

The Roots of Education are Bitter... is its Fruit all that Sweet?

In his famous “Advice to Scholars”, David Guramishvili wrote (translation by Venera Urushadze): If you seek happiness and good, First taste the bitterness of gall, For bitter roots yield sweetest fruits, And honest labour blesses all. Guramishvili is a passionate advocate of learning not as a means of getting a better job or achieving any other pragmatic objective. For him, the fruit of education is sweet because “wisdom to the wise brings calm and makes him master of his lot”. Learning is thus seen a goal in and of itself. Judging by today’s r...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
3774
0 Comments
Write a Comment

Our Partners